Can These Bones Live: Urban Decay Chic

I don’t remember how I came onto this blog, but the author of this piece (link below) makes a couple of very incisive points:

1) People who move into abandoned, decaying urban areas desire that type of environment, and any change, any improvement, will upset them, not just gentrification. This is a big problem in the “East Village” of New York, but one which is growing smaller as this population ages.

2) If people feel the need to live in these areas, they still exist. Cleveland, Detroit… Detroit! They privatized the government and turned off the water to those who cannot pay! If you’re an artist and need that type of deprivation, it’s there waiting for you!

Can These Bones Live: Urban Decay Chic.

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The Human Scale | Relational Cartographies

Today I’m going through my Drafts folder and posting links to other blogs that I clicked the “Press This” link while reading but didn’t immediately post. This came from Relational Cartographies, reblogged by urbanculturanstudies:


 
I haven’t seen this yet, but it’s important to point out that efforts such as bike lanes and pedestrian malls are not temporary and isolated, nor the result of “12 years of Bloomberg”.

51 Astor Place, East Village, NYC | Mid‑Century Mundane

Some weeks (months?) ago, I was looking for a photo of the Cooper Union building that now no longer exists (the building, not the photo). I know I have one, but for my purposes, I didn’t need my own — any would do.

That’s when I found this fantastic blog, called Mid-Century Mundane. It’s a name I would have chosen!

Anyway, this is what the author had to say about the Cooper Union building, but you should bookmark this site.

51 Astor Place, East Village, NYC | Mid-Century Mundane.