MoRUS 2014 Film Festival Photos

Quilas readers may recall from such posts as MoRUS Film Festival at Orchard Alley that I took photos of their two screenings at Orchard Alley Community Garden. Given that I’m a member of that garden, I do this.

This year, I agreed to take pictures of each night’s screening at the other gardens. Here’s one, at La Plaza Cultural, August 7:

morus-at-la-plaza-20140807

The rest can be viewed here.

Advertisements

MoRUS Film Festival at Orchard Alley

There is an organization in my neighborhood called the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space. They’re located in the same building as an existing squat, called C‑Squat, at 155 Avenue C.

One of the things they do, aside from holding talks in their space and giving walking tours of the neighborhood, is sponsor a film festival. This year the theme is “Women of the Lower East Side.”

We at Orchard Alley Community Garden*, where I’ve been a member for ten years, were very happy once again to host screenings. Saturday night was “Your Day Is My Night,” directed by Lynne Sachs, about immigrant residents of a “shift-bed” apartment in Chinatown. The director and many of the cast were in attendance, and answered questions after (with translators). Sunday night was “Sweatshop Cinderella: A Portrait Of Anzia Yezierska,” directed by Suzanne Wasserman, about the Jewish Lower East Side in the 1920s through 1950s, and the life of novelist Anzia Yezierska. Again, the director was present and answered questions afterward.

film-fest-20140802-0611
That’ll be $5, please!

film-fest-20140802-0610
Setting up

=-=-=-=-=

* Quilas is not associated with Orchard Alley Community Garden.
In honor of the 180th anniversary of the birth of John Venn (August 4, 1834), creator of the Venn Diagram, I will demonstrate the relationship in graphic form:
 
quilas-oa-venn-diagram

Tompkins Square Park 26th Police-Riot Reunion

Time certainly flies. It seems like only yesterday I was writing about the Tompkins Square Park 25th Police-Riot Reunion, and here we are now at year 26.

It’s raining as I write this (8/2 – 08:15) — it’s forecasted to rain all day — but the show will go on, rain or shine, says the promoter.

The weird thing about weather.com is that when you look at the summary forecast, it says one thing:

26-tsp-reunion-weather

but when you check the hourly forecast, oftentimes it says something completely different:

26-tsp-reunion-weather-hourly

What’s up with that? How are you supposed to know what to believe?

Another thing I don’t like about weather.com is that when you connect, to find out what the weather will be, you’re met with links to videos that have nothing to do with the weather:

26-tsp-reunion-weather-videos

* * *

Since it’s Saturday and I’m not working, I don’t have to plan ahead what to wear or take with me. I’ll base my decision on whatever’s happening at 12:45. I’ll take an umbrella, just in case. I don’t want my camera to get wet. And it’s six hours long, so I’m going to bring my book!

This year there are only two days of concerts. The bands are:

Saturday
Iconicide
Nihilistics
Ruckus Interruptus
Transgendered Jesus
Urban Waste

Sunday
Bowery Boys
Hammerbrain
David Peel
Penguin
Rosabelle Selavy
Sewage
The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black

* * *

Saturday

I arrived at Tompkins just before 1:00pm, when the flier said they would begin.

Little did I know that they meant begin building the stage!

26-tsp-reunion-building-stage
12:48

I called my wife and told her I could help her take her books over the The Strand to sell now, after all, as she had wanted, instead of at some unspecified time in the future, as I had wanted.

When I got back over to the park, at around 2:30, Chris Flash was introducing the weekend’s events:

26-tsp-reunion-chris-flash
Concert organizer Chris Flash

He talked a bit about the riot, the days that followed, and the inception of The Shadow. When he was finished, he said there were still ten minutes left and anyone “who can speak coherently, who isn’t a complete lunatic” could come up and speak. Fortunately, only one lunatic spoke. Unfortunately, he wasn’t incoherent.

The bands finally started at around 3:00. I couldn’t stay for the whole show, though. I had to get back to the garden where I’m a member, for the screening of “Your Day is My Night,” part of the MoRUS “Women of the Lower East Side” film festival.

* * *

Sunday

It’s clear to me now that the flier distributed to promote this show was wrong: it was not scheduled to start at 1:00. I arrived just before 1:00 again, and sat on a bench watching the stage builders rebuild the stage.* I thought about waiting until 3:00, but it rained earlier and it was very humid, and I had a lot of work to do at home, before picking up my son from Grand Central, so I decided to just pack it in and go back home. I didn’t see any of Sunday’s show, so the only video I have is of the first three bands that played on Saturday.

But before that! One of the people in the video featured prominently in a previous Quilas piece. Do you know which one? The first correct responder will receive the Quilas Certificate of Recognition, suitable for framing!

certificate-of-recognition

Now, on to the video!
 

=-=-=-=-=

* Wasn’t the deal with the city that they would provide a temporary stage, in exchange for tearing down the bandshell? Did the time expire on that deal, or did they just renege? Or is it something else? Answer in the Comments section. You won’t get a certificate, but doing the right thing is its own reward.

Pawn Shops

[This is part of the Release the Kraken! series.]

September 6, 2013

In the piece Quilas: Bike Sharer, I mentioned the web site Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York. The current post on that day was Gramercy Pawnbrokers. He was concerned about a For Rent sign he saw over a pawn broker’s sign, and that they might be closing.

I commented that along with liquor stores and check cashing places, pawn shops are the scourge of poor neighborhoods. My comment was rejected. Here are some that were not:

jvny-pawnshops-1

jvny-pawnshops-3

Too many people don’t take the time to think about what it is they’re defending.

Adding Insult to Injury

During this time when I’m not working on any of the 41 pieces in my Drafts folder, I will pass on this story from last week’s Guardian.

The Job Centre bar “promises upmarket pub food in an atmosphere of quirky design features inspired by its function as a place that once served the unemployed.” The actual job center, located in a part of London with a high level of unemployment, was closed in 2010.

    “The bar’s name and its interior design suggest that you want potential clientele to understand that your bar is for the new people moving into Deptford, for whom job centres are a joke, and not the existing residents of Deptford, for whom job centres are often a necessity …” – Jane Elliott, Lewisham People Before Profit

In the “East Village,” where there are no job centers, gentrifying bars took names like Downtown Beirut, celebrating the Israeli bombardment of 1982.

beirut

No-7Eleven-NYC Packs It In

I can’t remember when the last time was that I wrote about N7E. When their founding member quit? Maybe. I unsubscribed from their blog and stopped visiting their Twitter page because it was just a lot of nonsense.

Well, things have been getting steadily worse for them, it seems. I was wondering recently how long they were going to keep up their “boycott” when I saw this:

quilas-n7e-packs-it-in-3

It’s the beginning of the end. They’ve reduced their weekly leafletting to once per month. Soon they’ll be gone completely. They won’t announce it — one first-Sunday they just won’t be there, then another, then it will be over.

Back in August of 2013, their founder wrote:

boycott-20130823-1100

I think a better reason it was doomed was that it had no social base. No one rallies for the small business owner — it’s antithetical to the class itself. If they had been fighting for the rights of the workers, they could have developed something — look at what just happened in Seattle! — but the only time they mentioned the workers was to attack them. They accused them of vandalizing other businesses in the neighborhood, smoking pot behind the store, menacing the leafletters… This was never a cause that deserved support. The sooner they wither away, the better.

Hyper-Gentrification Revisited

In Hyper-Gentrification, I wrote about a blogger called Jeremiah Moss. Specifically, about something he wrote called On Spike Lee & Hyper-Gentrification.

Since that time, he was invited to rewrite that piece for the New York Times, as part of their overview of gentrification. So his position, distilled, is:

    The old-school gentrification of the 20th century, while harmful, wasn’t all bad. It made streets safer, created jobs and brought fresh vegetables to the corner store. … Unlike gentrification, in which the agents of change were middle-class settlers moving into working-class and poor neighborhoods…

    …hyper-gentrification in New York was implemented via strategically planned mass rezonings, eminent domain and billions in tax breaks to corporations…

    So before gentrification became “hyper”, it wasn’t all bad, according to Moss. When the process of removing the working class from their neighborhood was happening, using all of the tools at the disposal of both real estate developers and the city, from illegal evictions, to arson, to filling vacant apartments with drug dealers to drive out tenants, to turning over in rem buildings to “developers” for pennies on the dollar, to programs like AHOP, this wasn’t all bad. The same private/public interests (themselves, bourgeois legalisms) were at play as today, at the then-existing level of development.

Moss sees gentrification starting when people and small businesses start to move into an area where they weren’t before. He fails to understand the processes that led to that, despite his many references to Neil Smith. He doesn’t see the “flipping” of buildings (buildings bought and then sold at a profit, sometimes without any renovations being made) as part of the process, or even the transition from a healthy building stock to a decrepit one. For him, as for so many like him, it starts when the outward signs become noticeable.

So what is his solution?

    Let’s drastically reduce tax breaks to corporations and redirect that money to mom-and-pops. Protect the city’s oldest small businesses by providing selective retail rent control, and implement the Small Business Survival Act to create fair rent negotiations. Pass a citywide ordinance to control the spread of chain stores. … Shop local and protest the corporate invasion of neighborhoods.

Increase taxes on corporations? OK. Direct the money to small businesses? To what end? If the Small Business Survival Act creates fair rent negotiations (Moss’s contention), small business rents will be lower. So what will they do with the money? Raise their employees’ wages? Ha! Pocket the money? Probably. Use the money to expand? Probably. So the small businesses will become big businesses, in time. Maybe even chains. Regarding shopping locally, I’ve already addresses that.

Moss’s changes will only benefit small business owners. That is his starting and ending point.

    This … is the transformation of society in a democratic way, but a transformation within the bounds of the petty bourgeoisie. … [I]t believes that the special conditions of its emancipation are the general conditions within whose frame alone modern society can be saved and the class struggle avoided.*

=-=-=-=-=

* The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, accessed April 27, 2014.

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries