Fallout

I posted Class Struggle on Avenue A on November 11 at 15:29. Twenty minutes later, a founding member of No 7-Eleven NYC wrote on his blog:

    NO711 is headed towards a racially divided face-off […]
    At a meeting with the NO711 group in June, I let the group
    know that I didn’t want to be involved…

I commend him for this action. Not so much leaving the group, which happened back in June, in any case, but for making it public. I had a feeling that my post would bring us back into contact, and when it did, I already had my reply ready: to preserve your self-respect, publicly divorce yourself from the group. I did not expect him to beat me to the punch.

Meanwhile, no other blog has picked up on this. The N7E blog says nothing about it, not even a fare-thee-well. And EV Grieve, who’s written about them 38 times this year (maybe more, if any of the posts are missing the “No 7-Eleven” tag), is also silent about it. Likewise with The Villager, another of their cheerleaders.

Am I the only one who thinks this is newsworthy?

***

As regular readers of Quilas know, N7E has been gathering outside the 7-Eleven on Avenue A every Sunday afternoon since the store opened, calling for a boycott. While researching “Class Struggle…”, I came across a comment of his, that I used in another context elsewhere:

fallout-boycott-useless

I’m starting to wonder to what degree he was pushed out?

***

Speaking of The Villager, they ran a story last week called “Small shops already feeling the crunch from 7-Eleven”.

    Although 7-Eleven is a cheaper alternative to traditional mom-and-pop stores, the majority of local residents The Villager recently polled about the new store agreed with No 7-Eleven. They said they would rather preserve the small businesses in the area than save money.

“[T]he majority of local residents The Villager recently polled” were the twelve people standing outside the store holding signs!

If you’re going to argue against large corporations like 7-Eleven, or Wal*Mart, you can’t use the argument that their prices are lower, unless of course your audience has a higher discretionary income. When has The Villager ever run an article titled: “Small stores gouge customers with higher prices”?

Their article ran with a chart bearing the title “Can a bodega compete with 7‑Eleven?” (What do they think competition is?!) I revised it, below:

price-chart''

For the record, I checked these prices today, as I did my Thanksgiving shopping. Carnation Evaporated Milk, 12 oz can, 10 for $10! Do bodegas even have evaporated milk?

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Fine Fare

Fine Fare is a supermarket at the end of my block. I’ve never liked this store, for many reasons, some of which are: 1) they used to make you check your bag when you went in; 2) they used to make you pay for your deli purchases at the deli counter, instead of at the register; 3) the baggers used to shake you down for tips, especially this one woman who was not quite well and would chase you out of the store if you didn’t tip her. The workers there are not unionized, the way they are at Key Food and Associated. It always seemed to me that they should organize and demand more money from the owners rather than from the customers.

Well, I say “used to” because now things are changing. I wish I had a photo of the entrance before the new gates and awning were put in a couple of weeks ago. The previous gates were set up to deter shopping-cart theft, and you could barely fit through the opening. That by itself made it undesirable to enter, in a feng shui sort of way. Now you can see that they’ve opened it up quite a bit.

finefare-entrance1

finefare-entrance2

Take a look at photo above. Where that man is standing there used to be shelves. I don’t even remember what was there, but it limited the entrance-way only slightly less than the gates you would have just passed through. And there stood one of the employees, who would ask for your bag, and give you half a playing card as your receipt. I’ve lived on this block for over ten years, and after the first time I went in and refused to turn over my bag and was told I couldn’t come in, I never went back (with my bag) again. I was so annoyed by it that I would go to Key Food, until Associated opened on 8th Street, even though both were more expensive. This past year, I decided I was just going to refuse to give my bag to them and see what happened. Twice they asked for it and twice I declined (politely, of course), and both times they let me in. They were already softening!

Well now that’s all over. Where the people’s bags used to be stashed are now shelves with… food!

I saw the owner (manager?) and told him I really liked the changes. He was quite proud of it himself, and gave me a brief tour, showing me where the new refrigerator units would go, and where the new five-level shelves would go, replacing the existing, two-level shelves, and told me they were putting in new floors too, although that would be the last thing they do, since he didn’t want them to be ruined by all the materials coming in. The whole project should be completed by March, he said.

I tell you, I’m quite pleased by this. I’ve bought plenty of stuff from Fine Fare over the years (it’s only when I had my bag that I wouldn’t go in) but I’ll be glad to do all my grocery shopping there in the future. We might not even have to go to Fairway any more!

Fine Fare, like no other fare!