‘No 7-Eleven NYC’ Comes Clean

Finally! It was like pulling teeth!

Since shortly after their inception, I have maintained that No 7‑Eleven NYC is a group of people whose activities promote the interests of small businesses in the “East Village”. Nothing could have been more obvious from their literature. Yet when I raised the issue, here and on other forums, they denied it fervently. It was strange, but that’s what they did.

Well finally, in an email discussion I’ve been having with one of their leaders, they admit it:

email-from-n7e

So galling must it have been for them to admit this that they followed up immediately with:

email-from-n7e-shill

What I’ve written about them (12 out of a total of 45 posts) has been opposed to, not so much their aims as, the limitations of their aims. 7‑Eleven opening up was an opportunity to examine existing social relations in the neighborhood. I seized that opportunity; they didn’t. They could have shone a light on conditions of workers at bodegas, as I did. They could have examined why the choices were limited to 7‑Elevens and bodegas, as I did. Instead they ignored it all, focusing on superficialities and nativist fears.

I could be wrong, but I have the feeling that now that they’ve stepped forward and admitted their class bias, I’ll probably write less about them. They will go on promoting the interests of small-business owners over both their employees as well as their competitors (how will they do this when one bodega threatens another?), and I will continue to promote the interests of the workers. Once 7‑Eleven moves in, I will advocate for the people who work there, the way No 7‑Eleven NYC does not advocate for the people who work in bodegas.

***

But wait! What’s this?:

n7e-mission-stmt-chg

They’re going to start concerning themselves with labor? Hmmm, maybe I will keep writing about them.

See you in the salt mine.

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